WootBot


quality posts: 15 Private Messages WootBot

Staff

Balance Bikes - 2 Models, 4 Colors

Speed to First Woot:
4m 33.668s
First Sucker:
jonrupert
Last Wooter to Woot:
NNPDeb
Last Purchase:
a year ago
Order Pace (rank):
Top 33% of Kids Woots
Top 29% of all Woots
Woots Sold (rank):
Top 10% of Kids Woots
Top 11% of all Woots

Purchaser Experience

  • 20% first woot
  • 6% second woot
  • 27% < 10 woots
  • 24% < 25 woots
  • 23% ≥ 25 woots

Purchaser Seniority

  • 16% joined today
  • 1% one week old
  • 2% one month old
  • 11% one year old
  • 70% > one year old

Quantity Breakdown

  • 89% bought 1
  • 11% bought 2
  • 1% bought 3

Percentage of Sales Per Hour

3%
2%
1%
1%
2%
2%
3%
5%
8%
8%
7%
6%
7%
4%
5%
5%
5%
4%
3%
4%
3%
3%
6%
3%
12 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Woots by State

zero wooters wootinglots of wooters wooting



Quality Posts


conanthelibrarian


quality posts: 3795 Private Messages conanthelibrarian

Check out these comments from when these were offered in May

lichme


quality posts: 3111 Private Messages lichme

Product Page with more info about BootScootBikes

conanthelibrarian


quality posts: 3795 Private Messages conanthelibrarian

Let's watch a video

conanthelibrarian


quality posts: 3795 Private Messages conanthelibrarian

Let's learn all about Boot Scoot Bikes

adhurt


quality posts: 14 Private Messages adhurt

So I have a 21 month old daughter who LOVES her bike with a chain and training wheels (grandparents gave it to her)... except that its way to big for her.

Are these actually worth it?

"Never underestimate the power of human stupidity..." Lazarus Long

chrisandersoon


quality posts: 0 Private Messages chrisandersoon

I don't understand these bikes. I saw one on Shark Tank as well with a removable seat to turn it into a scooter. I have a 6 year old and am teaching her to ride a bike. I read online to just take the pedals off the a regular bike (it turns it into one of these) and once she learns how to coast and balance herself add the pedals back.

nesiebug


quality posts: 8 Private Messages nesiebug
Are these actually worth it?



I don't know...but they're so darn cute I want one myself!

MichXelle


quality posts: 38 Private Messages MichXelle
chrisandersoon wrote:I don't understand these bikes. I saw one on Shark Tank as well with a removable seat to turn it into a scooter. I have a 6 year old and am teaching her to ride a bike. I read online to just take the pedals off the a regular bike (it turns it into one of these) and once she learns how to coast and balance herself add the pedals back.

We saw that episode too. My wife thought this was the same bike. We ordered it for a young nephew who's family just had a baby brother. We gift to the other children when a baby is born. Just a little something to make them feel good. I think he will like this.

OVER 550 W00T CARTFULS as of 06/25/14. You're killing us with some wonderful items W000T!

OVER 8 years on W00T shopping and The W00T Forum, since 02/06 with now a whopping 34 Quality Posts L-M-A-O! We do post quality information as do others that isn't recognized. Thanks for the 3 in 1 entire week! We're humbled. 3 additional noticed in 3 months. No more positive posts as our are not noticed.

Prime Suspect


quality posts: 22 Private Messages Prime Suspect

No one needs this product. With a wrench you can just remove the pedals of a bicycle, and drop the seat so they can reach the ground with her feet. Once they've learned how to balance, steer and stop, you can put the pedals back on and teach them how to pedal it. I've seen kids learn how to ride a bike in a single afternoon using this method. And there's no need for a special device to do it.

wingedsurfgirl


quality posts: 25 Private Messages wingedsurfgirl

Bought one like this (metal frame) for my son when he was around 2. Yes, we could've chose to go with a regular bike and removed the pedals, but honestly, with the amount of time he spent on it, and as much as he loved it, it was worth it. For his fourth birthday (recently ), we bought him a pedal bike. At first we thought we wouldn't need to use the training wheels at all, but after trying without, determined that we would put them on at a high setting. He does great now! I think he'll be off the training wheels a lot quicker than if he'd not had the balance bike, with a lot less frustration. He's also outgrown the frame on the balance bike, and so we still would have had to buy a new bike. I don't see it as a waste of money at all. If anything, it probably saved us money. The bike we bought cost around $200, the balance under $60.

kgamon


quality posts: 8 Private Messages kgamon

Strider is the way to go. My son started with a cheaper knock-off, but the Strider is lighter than a typical bike and has durable plastic wheels that don't require inflating. It also has a flat rear fork, so the child can rest his/her feet on the back while coasting. This one has a major design flaw in that the rear fork is angled.

You can certainly argue that no one NEEDS a balance bike - but that's really beside the point. My son has the Strider and a pedal bike with training wheels, and he always chooses the Strider. Fun for going fast. Don't be ghetto and take the pedals off. Suck it up Mom and Dad. Still, this brand probably won't satisfy.

Ryukyu King

labyrinthia


quality posts: 15 Private Messages labyrinthia
adhurt wrote:So I have a 21 month old daughter who LOVES her bike with a chain and training wheels (grandparents gave it to her)... except that its way to big for her.

Are these actually worth it?



They are definitely worth it. I like using both, the balance bike and the training wheel bike, so the kids have both skills mastered prior to having to combine them. Oh, and using an undersized bike when you remove the training wheels.

Both kids had their training wheels off by 4. Neighborhood kids didn't have them off till 6. It took them both one afternoon to master riding without training wheels, and they didn't have any skinned knees or major crashes until they were older and started doing "tricks".

The only issue is making sure the one you get fits. The ones I got were a bit big, so they weren't able to ride them until 3 years old. The ones I bought were wee ride knock offs, and honestly, they worked as well as striders, except for the whole being too big.

bluemaple


quality posts: 77 Private Messages bluemaple

Well, that's one way to reduce production cost and stand out from a crowd of throwaway bikes - completely skip the drivetrain!

We have 4 kids, now all long past this stage. They were in this size bike so briefly we found the garage-sale/friend-hand-me-down route to work just fine. And then you get to pass the bikes on again, continuing the cycle...

I guess if you have fifty bucks burning a hole or you're a grandparent these would be fun but otherwise I'd save the money for their future bikes that should be useful longer.

zomigi


quality posts: 4 Private Messages zomigi

My husband really wants to get a balance bike for my daughter, who will be 5 in December. But I think they'll be too small for her. She's pretty tall for her age. I think she'a about 4 feet tall. Is she still small enough to get some use out of the bigger balance bike being sold here, or too big for either of them?

Striktly


quality posts: 1 Private Messages Striktly

I think these bikes are definitely worth it. When my son was 3 we purchased one of these and it didn't take long before he was able to graduate to a pedal bike. Sure, you can take the pedals off a bike but it isn't quite the same but will save you a dime. Most kids/toddlers already know how to pedal from tricycles or other similar toys so once they get the hang of balancing putting it all together will take no time. The bike definitely served it's purpose which is strictly for learning to balance and it will be recycled for my 2 year old in a few months when his motor skills are up to par.

ChiByakko


quality posts: 2 Private Messages ChiByakko

We have two of these in our house, one of which is a smaller model with a flat rear fork and a foot-rest. The smaller model can be used by a 1.5 year old, and the larger model is best for 2.5 and older. We bought the bigger one for our son's 2nd birthday. He's tall, but his inseam is short, so he needed the smaller model. When purchasing, measure your child's inseam before buying! Luckily, we have another little one who will be riding next year, so we bought the smaller one too. It's a much better fit.

These bikes are amazing. They are reasonably priced, work for the kid for a couple of years, and hold up well to heavy play so that they can be passed on or sold second-hand to recoup costs.

Balance bikes build confidence and help a kid learn about biking when they are still small enough for a trike rather than a bike. I'd much rather buy one of these than a tricycle any day!

omoomo


quality posts: 15 Private Messages omoomo
Prime Suspect wrote:No one needs this product. With a wrench you can just remove the pedals of a bicycle, and drop the seat so they can reach the ground with her feet. Once they've learned how to balance, steer and stop, you can put the pedals back on and teach them how to pedal it. I've seen kids learn how to ride a bike in a single afternoon using this method. And there's no need for a special device to do it.



This...a thousand times this.

wreckz


quality posts: 1 Private Messages wreckz
bluemaple wrote:Shameless self-promotion with that link: (ad revenue for wooter eyeballs on that site... Avoid the appearance by pasting your views directly on woot)



Apologies if I offended anyone by referencing a blog post I felt was relevant. I won't post a link next time. In sum, I'm with the "take off the pedals" people.

sunnydelight004


quality posts: 0 Private Messages sunnydelight004
adhurt wrote:So I have a 21 month old daughter who LOVES her bike with a chain and training wheels (grandparents gave it to her)... except that its way to big for her.

Are these actually worth it?



ABSOLUTELY! These are absolutely worth every penny. We bought a wooden one off of here and that was not worth the money and returned it because it was broken within minutes. However, we purchased a Strider balance bike and paid all of $100 and both my kids learned how to ride a bike without training wheels in just 2 weeks (girls r 5 and 3 1/2) of riding their balance bike! No running behind chasing and holding a seat and breaking our backs. They just got on their 2 wheeled bikes and took off on their own.

labyrinthia


quality posts: 15 Private Messages labyrinthia
omoomo wrote:This...a thousand times this.



It won't be the same just removing the pedals as there will be more resistance and more "sticky out" spots that can cause the legs to be tripped up (usually the bolts stick out where the training wheels go).

Plus, if you have a cheap huffy bike, you'll have some difficulty getting the pedals back on and getting the training wheels on straight.

Honestly, $50 is worth not having to deal with that headache. If I wanted to be a bike mechanic I'd work at a bike shop.

wreckz


quality posts: 1 Private Messages wreckz
sunnydelight004 wrote:ABSOLUTELY! These are absolutely worth every penny. We bought a wooden one off of here and that was not worth the money and returned it because it was broken within minutes. However, we purchased a Strider balance bike and paid all of $100 and both my kids learned how to ride a bike without training wheels in just 2 weeks (girls r 5 and 3 1/2) of riding their balance bike! No running behind chasing and holding a seat and breaking our backs. They just got on their 2 wheeled bikes and took off on their own.



With respect, I think the argument against that would be spending $100 on something that was only used for 2 weeks or so when you can get a 12" wheel bicycle for $40 at Walmart that can be used for a year or two.

I can see a purpose of getting the smaller one as kids that size probably won't be able to glide on the smallest regular bicycle. But then again, if they master that small balance bike they'll be too small to ride a regular bike. I feel the purpose is to get to riding a regular bike as quickly as possible.


bluemaple


quality posts: 77 Private Messages bluemaple
labyrinthia wrote:It won't be the same just removing the pedals as there will be more resistance and more "sticky out" spots that can cause the legs to be tripped up (usually the bolts stick out where the training wheels go).

Plus, if you have a cheap huffy bike, you'll have some difficulty getting the pedals back on and getting the training wheels on straight.

Honestly, $50 is worth not having to deal with that headache. If I wanted to be a bike mechanic I'd work at a bike shop.


@labyrinthia, everyone places a different value on fifty bucks. My kids learned just fine and minus injuries without removing the pedals.

Number one bike pet peeve: kids (and parents setting a bad example) not wearing well-fitted bike helmets.

wreckz


quality posts: 1 Private Messages wreckz
labyrinthia wrote:It won't be the same just removing the pedals as there will be more resistance and more "sticky out" spots that can cause the legs to be tripped up (usually the bolts stick out where the training wheels go).

Plus, if you have a cheap huffy bike, you'll have some difficulty getting the pedals back on and getting the training wheels on straight.

Honestly, $50 is worth not having to deal with that headache. If I wanted to be a bike mechanic I'd work at a bike shop.



When you buy a huffy bike it comes with the pedals off.. so either way it you're really just putting them on once. Either after you've bought a balance bike and they're ready for a real bike, or after they've used the huffy as a balance bike and are ready for pedals.

For gliding on a regular bike, I have to agree it's slightly more difficult to shuffle along. That isn't necessarily a bad thing, since I don't think you really want them using it as a mode of transportation (more like a learning device). I see a lot of kids on balance bikes that are probably ready for a real bike. In my experience the best way is to learn on a slightly sloped grass hill they can progressively learn to ride down. If you do that way, you won't have to worry about catching on bolts or pedal arms (something that has never happened to us either way).

Finally, my 3rd kid is on that same cheap huffy bike and we haven't had any problems yet.

hjfeather


quality posts: 0 Private Messages hjfeather

Balance bikes are great. I know 5 boys who used ours & were riding on their own by age 4. One boy who was age 6, tall and not confident enough to ride a pedal bike, 4 hours on the balance bike ( which was tiny) and he was on his big bike around the block. However, our balance bike had hand breaks which really allows for control of your ride. These don't seem to have breaks at all.

75blazer


quality posts: 3 Private Messages 75blazer

We got a balance bike for our 3 year old son for Christmas. By mid June he was riding a regular bike with no training wheels. Even though he can ride a "big boy" bike, he still often prefers the balance bike. Our 6 year old occasionally will take it for a spin as well. Worth every penny. Disregard all the "just take the pedals off" people. Even though the pedals are gone, the cranks, chain and sprocket are still there giving THIER children plenty of places to get tripped up and hurt.

Rooker156


quality posts: 3 Private Messages Rooker156

No pedals? No Brakes? I live on a hill. What prevents my child from rolling down it out of control?

shirts galore....

tshaman


quality posts: 0 Private Messages tshaman
Rooker156 wrote:No pedals? No Brakes? I live on a hill. What prevents my child from rolling down it out of control?



Hopefully you! Any responsible parent wouldn't just throw their kid on this stupid waste of money unsupervised and hope they figure it out on their own!

cdhuttonsc


quality posts: 0 Private Messages cdhuttonsc

My daughter got one of these (Kinderbike brand) at about age 20 months, and within a day or two she was very comfortable with it. She now goes a couple of miles at a time with it. The Kinderbike one has a brake, but my daughter (not yet 2 1/2) doesn't use it. She just uses her feet. On steep hills she just puts her feet down more often. She LOVES her balance bike.

ndp16


quality posts: 0 Private Messages ndp16

HORRIBLE audio recording.
Try not to shove it all the way down your throat when you speak.

Im 41 seconds in and I've wasted 41 seconds already. Say something in 41 seconds other than BLAH BLAH BLAH.

The person speaking sounds like they are trying to be something they're not...a narrator.

ndp16


quality posts: 0 Private Messages ndp16
Rooker156 wrote:No pedals? No Brakes? I live on a hill. What prevents my child from rolling down it out of control?



You're supposed to buy the options 200 feet of bunji cord.
Fine print, read the fine, oh so fine baby girl, print.