WootBot


quality posts: 14 Private Messages WootBot

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Hey everyone! It's been awhile. Lots of new things going on in this neck of the woods. My son officially transitioned from the infant to the toddler room at daycare. Big, exciting stuff, I tell ya. He's 15 months old and into everything. Still not saying a word, though. Well, nothing intelligible at least. There may have been a "dog" once or twice, but not sure. I think he might also be trying to say, "bye bye."

At his one year appointment, his pediatrican seemed concerned that he wasn't saying real words with intent behind them. Like he'll say "ma ma" and "da da" but not really AT us. But he babbles A LOT. He's constantly chattering away, like he's having a conversation but without saying actual words.

People have told me that, one day out of nowhere, he'll start talking in full phrases. I'm still waiting. I know that kids do things in their own time on their own terms. I also realize that it's very unlikely that he'll be 20 years old and still talking gibberish. But at what point should I be concerned that he's not reaching his developmental milestones?

When did your kids start talking? Was it later or earlier than "normal" or was it right on track?

jachim72


quality posts: 3 Private Messages jachim72

Our daughter is just about the same age (16 months now), and she's not talking - or walking - yet, either. At her 1 year, the doc suggested we get her evaluated for the walking bit, and those people also want to look at her speech.

She only says 1 word reliably, and that's the cat's name! I use a recording of her first attempts as my SMS alert, and she perks up and repeats it every time I get a text.

Funny thing, though. After her 1 year appt., we started putting solid soled shoes on her most of the time, and that helped her learn to stand better (not on the sides and tops of her feet) and she's just about walking now.

My boss says one of his daughters didn't talk until 18+ months, and when she did it was in full paragraphs...

tzaba


quality posts: 0 Private Messages tzaba

My dad is a doc and was sufficiently freaked out about how long it took our daughter to talk that we ended up going to some specialists to make sure everything was okay.

Now, she won't shut up.

Be mindful of the situation with your kid. At the same time, allow for some areas of development to take longer than others.

I can't remember when our girl first started talking (she'll be 5 in April), but I wouldn't worry just yet.

If your son is talking "gibberish", then he is probably on the right path.

Learning a language (esp. English) is hard. If you read to him all the time, talk to him all the time, etc. then, yeah, one day you will open your eyes and he will be saying "da da. Breakfast. Now! I hungry!"

Moueska


quality posts: 54 Private Messages Moueska

Remember - Reading does help their vocabulary, so taking him to the library can sometimes be lengthy excursion - but park yourself in the kids section with him and read picture books.

Bring a few home, read to him at the end of his night.


My four-year-old has gotten to where he reads two books nightly with his daddy, and I've taken to borrowing "Best of" and "Treasury" kids collections from the library. Just buying individual books just won't do!

However, it would seem that my son has also graduated (slightly) from having to have pictures all the time - I read him a folk tale about a giant who is tormented by a bedbug, a mosquito, a tiny bird, and a small snake... he thought it was hilarious.

There was a total of one picture for three pages full of text.

Sooooo... YMMV.


Also, depending on how his speech develops, you may get him in touch with a speech therapist if he doesn't seem to be developing as fast as the teachers think he should.

amynance


quality posts: 6 Private Messages amynance

Staff

Thanks for the advice, everyone. I'm not super worried about it yet, but we'll see how it goes over the next month or so.

amynance


quality posts: 6 Private Messages amynance

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tzaba wrote:

Now, she won't shut up.



This totally cracked me up. Be careful what you wish for, right? ;)

amylouise


quality posts: 0 Private Messages amylouise

I think you should bring this up at your next appointment with the pediatrician. Meanwhile, make note of things like: Does he point? Does he communicate with you in other ways besides verbally to tell you what he wants?

Chances are very good that your kid is just fine. However, my kid isn't; he has autism and I knew something wasn't right even though everyone kept telling me, "Oh pretty soon he'll talk so much you'll wish he'd shut up". That hasn't happened yet.

If you have concerns, pay attention to them. If your pediatrician tells you he's fine and you're still not sure, ask the pediatrician to go through a developmental milestone checklist. If you still have the slightest doubt, contact your state's Early Intervention program and ask for an evaluation.

You will find many people who will reassure you but the most important person to listen to is yourself. Because I KNEW something wasn't right with my happy, loving, sunshiny kid, we got him tons of help right away and he's doing very well now.

As I said, the odds are your son is fine. But why not find out for sure? Wishing you all the best and good for you for being your son's best advocate.

jbpa44


quality posts: 0 Private Messages jbpa44

When I read this I almost thought my husband had posted it. Our son is just shy of 16 months and says nothing. NOTHING. He babbles a lot, some nonspecific 'mama, dada' and lots of vowel sounds but that is all. We've heard all the same stuff you have and our pediatrician has assured us that all is well. Despite this, we are frustrated to say the least. The most reassuring thing is that he seems to be trying to communicate. He points at things and babbles, uses inflection while babbling, and smiles to indicate joy. He follows one step commands (most of the time) without hand gestures. We just keep waiting for those first words. I'm sure the kids are fine..but I can sympathize.

allibear612


quality posts: 2 Private Messages allibear612

15 months sounds awfully early to be concerned about speech, especially for a boy, who generally develop speech later than girls.
In the case of a few of my nephews, they were talking and my sisters were not picking up on the fact that they were using actual words (just not, you know, quite right so it was tough to understand). While one of my sisters was in the middle of explaining how the youngest nephew gibbers on and on without any words, I heard him say three almost words - for example PUZZAH ("puzzle" while pointing to a puzzle) but it was in amongst other gibberish so if you weren't trying really really hard to listen you may not catch the real words.
For my daughter, at 17 months she had a very small handful of words (AH DONE, MAMA, DADA, etc) plus a few words that were totally wrong but we knew what they meant (BLALYA was water) plus a ton of gibberish. Then she had a huge jump and by 19 months it was short sentences (I DO MY BY SELF, I WANT MAILK, etc). The vocabulary exploded - OCTAGON? Wait, seriously? I'm pretty sure I didn't know what an octagon was until I was like 6.
We did a lot of reading, mostly before bed, and she also was in a pre-school style daycare where they taught her things. I am guessing those help a bit. But also just talking to her and engaging her.

amylouise


quality posts: 0 Private Messages amylouise

15 months is NOT too early to be worried about speech.

You will find a million people to reassure you and they will all say the same things:

"Boys talk later than girls
Pretty soon he'll be talking so much you'll wish he'd just be quiet
My nephew didn't talk until he was 2 and then he never stopped
I'm sure he's fine, stop looking for something to worry about
My kid this, my kid that, bla bla bla"

Listen to your gut. If you're concerned, get him checked out by a developmental pediatrician. We're not talking about painful invasive tests; its a simple office visit. Early intervention makes a huge difference. People mean well by telling you that since their kids turned out fine yours will too but they don't know what they're talking about. The only voice to listen to is the one that has you a little worried that something is up. Never doubt yourself.

shazzers


quality posts: 0 Private Messages shazzers

I'm a pediatric speech pathologist and the thing I always tell any parent is: if you are worried, get an evaluation. Many people may not know this, but ANYONE can have a free evaluation of their child done for any developmental concerns (speech, motor skills, behavior, etc.). It's called Child Find and you can just google it for your area to get the contact information. It's FREE, easy and if they do find any delays, your child might qualify for FREE therapy in your own home (you don't even have to leave your house! or they can also do it at daycare). And if your child does not qualify for services, they will give you ideas for how to help things move along. There is zero harm in doing it, it can only help, and earlier is always better. It is impossible to tell the kids who will just magically start talking at 18 months from those kids who actually do need some help to get things going. Good luck!

kcukvas


quality posts: 0 Private Messages kcukvas

Sheeesh, people relax... He's doing just fine... He's probably investing more energy into the motor development now that he is walking, moving around and exploring the new world at reach. In a few weeks he'll start saying hi/bye, wow, etc... All depends what kids/people around him are saying.... It's our impatience that's causing all this overthinking, I believe... Only thing I can recommend that can be of use for you (b/c we're all different and our kids as well) is - repeat, repeat, and then repeat some more... Verbalize every move you make, the shoe you put on his foot, every bite that he makes, etc... That'll get him chating....

kcukvas


quality posts: 0 Private Messages kcukvas

Oh, BTW, my son has the same hat!

amynance


quality posts: 6 Private Messages amynance

Staff

Thanks again everyone for all the comments and concerns. He points at EVERYTHING and we are constantly telling him "that's the light" "that's the door" "that's the dog" and repeat repeat repeat. I think I also might fall into the category where I don't think he's saying real words but he is and I'm just not identifying them because they don't sound exactly right. For instance, last night he pointed at the TV and I said, "TV" and he immediately responded "EEE." He also points at the dog and says "DAA." Occasionally he'll also put the phone up to his ear and say "Ohhh" which might mean "Hello"?

But you're right. It never hurts to get it checked out, so I think I'll look into that service that shazzers suggested. Thanks!

amynance


quality posts: 6 Private Messages amynance

Staff

kcukvas wrote:Oh, BTW, my son has the same hat!



HA! I love it. We get compliments on it a lot.

ziekk


quality posts: 7 Private Messages ziekk

Listen to your gut. If you find yourself thinking repeatedly that his milestones don't seem right and you're bothered by it, there's no harm in getting an evaluation done. It's an hour of time for your peace of mind. The milestones that therapists look for are much more detailed and accurate than most pediatricians and they'll be able to give you a more accurate look at things.

amylouise


quality posts: 0 Private Messages amylouise
kcukvas wrote:Sheeesh, people relax... He's doing just fine... He's probably investing more energy into the motor development now that he is walking, moving around and exploring the new world at reach. In a few weeks he'll start saying hi/bye, wow, etc... All depends what kids/people around him are saying.... It's our impatience that's causing all this overthinking, I believe... Only thing I can recommend that can be of use for you (b/c we're all different and our kids as well) is - repeat, repeat, and then repeat some more... Verbalize every move you make, the shoe you put on his foot, every bite that he makes, etc... That'll get him chating....



Oh, you've met this child, then? Otherwise how would you know he's doing fine? I wish more than anything that all the people who had your smug knowing attitude about my kid had been right. But they weren't. And to discourage someone you don't even know from getting their child checked, to imply that the parent is overreacting to a concern, demonstrates your ignorance and your misinformed belief that anyone's experience could somehow be different from your own.

runnerfrog13


quality posts: 10 Private Messages runnerfrog13
shazzers wrote:I'm a pediatric speech pathologist and the thing I always tell any parent is: if you are worried, get an evaluation. Many people may not know this, but ANYONE can have a free evaluation of their child done for any developmental concerns (speech, motor skills, behavior, etc.). It's called Child Find and you can just google it for your area to get the contact information. It's FREE,...


^ This. I was a worried parent and it was very reassuring to know that I could go and get a free evaluation by a specific professional who is trained to look at things like this. My pediatrician is good, and uses a general milestone checklist, but she's not intended to do a real evaluation. She was the person who reassured ME that it was free and if anything could reassure me that my child was doing ok.

Something that helped me decide(and what made me decide not to get an evaluation around 18 months) was sitting down and writing a list of "words" my child said. Not the words that sounded correct, but the sounds she was using to indicate a particular item with regularity. For instance "Beh" was her bear, "wah" was wall, etc. I was expecting less than 5 (Pedia told me between 5-10 was common around 18 mo). I got around 13. That reassured me enough to wait, and sure enough at 20 months there was a word-splosion. That's a happy story outcome, but it is worth doing if you don't have a gut feeling something is wrong but are just generally worried. Even if you do have a gut feeling, it can give you a nice starting point to describe/pinpoint what might be bothering you.