WootBot


quality posts: 14 Private Messages WootBot

Staff

Poll: “Time Out” for your children is:
  • 6.8% - a stool 44
  • 26% - a chair 167
  • 15.9% - a stair step 102
  • 38.7% - his or her room 249
  • 12.6% - Other (specify in the comments) 81
643 votes

Well, how do you fare compared to the Zeitgeist? Chat up your fellow wooters and let us know how lame this poll was or what obvious choices we missed. For example: Was this poll a) STUPID, b) DUMB, c) POINTLESS or d) ALL OF THE ABOVE?

BlackCreekBearTRP1


quality posts: 0 Private Messages BlackCreekBearTRP1

Standing face first in the corner

natalieug


quality posts: 11 Private Messages natalieug

On the floor in the middle of the living room.

baqui63


quality posts: 7 Private Messages baqui63

"Nose to the wall!"

(A corner works better, tho.)

Haven't used that in years tho, other than as a joke when my older one was like 15 or 16.

charliecarroll


quality posts: 104 Private Messages charliecarroll

good little swat on the ars

rainfall2112


quality posts: 0 Private Messages rainfall2112
BlackCreekBearTRP1 wrote:Standing face first in the corner



Seems too Blair Witchy to me.

amybrla


quality posts: 0 Private Messages amybrla

What is this "time out" crap? It's called "I told you not to do that, didn't I? You did it anyway." Consequences, a few swats on the ass and then kneeling on rice in the corner for 10 minutes. My sister is the "time out" princess and her spawn are the brattiest, most disrespectful, annoying, ill-mannered little twits ever.

bigyoda20


quality posts: 0 Private Messages bigyoda20

"Time Outs" are a waste of time, thought up by pacifist cry babies who don't eat meat.
"Ooh I have to go sit quiet for a few minutes, big whooptadiddydo! What are you going to do next, calmly, softly, with love in your voice, explain the life altering implications of running into the street and getting hit by a 2000 pound automobile?" HA!

neil1054


quality posts: 0 Private Messages neil1054

On the floor, in the corner, facing the wall.


Polly wants a WOOT!!!

Too many woots to list...besides my wife reads the posts & I don't want her to see how much I've really spent.

trenton21


quality posts: 0 Private Messages trenton21

"Time out" is sitting down where the crime was committed and listening to an explanation of why they got a time out and how to avoid one in the future.

viidim7


quality posts: 3 Private Messages viidim7

Time out works great for my three-year-old. When he gets old enough that it's not effective anymore, a spanking followed by time out will probably also work great.

roadlizard7


quality posts: 1 Private Messages roadlizard7

Six weeks of living hell!

andermabes2


quality posts: 0 Private Messages andermabes2

time out is.... another 5 minutes to think about what they did, and how to do it better next time so they don't get caught.

ChronoSquall14


quality posts: 39 Private Messages ChronoSquall14

The landing. Half a floor away from everyone.

note2001


quality posts: 25 Private Messages note2001

The car (with adult supervision). Time outs always worked very well when shopping and the little one tossed a tantrum in the store. Quickly leave the cart, nicely ask an employee to store in it the fridge if need be, and head to the car while letting the child know their behavior is unacceptable. When ready and they promise to be good, go back in. This is a one time only deal. After this experience none of my kids ever dared to toss another tantrum in public again.

Time outs at home quieted the child down, but rarely worked for driving a message home as there were always books around to entertain LOL.

RWoodward


quality posts: 58 Private Messages RWoodward

Doesn't anyone remember what a closet is?

hippie1981


quality posts: 0 Private Messages hippie1981

Time Out was always sitting in the corner on the floor. My daughter is 9 and its been a long time since I had to give her a time out. At her age, if she is having a rare meltdown, I just send her to her room and she can come out when she's calmed down.

RWoodward


quality posts: 58 Private Messages RWoodward
hippie1981 wrote:Time Out was always sitting in the corner on the floor. My daughter is 9 and its been a long time since I had to give her a time out. At her age, if she is having a rare meltdown, I just send her to her room and she can come out when she's calmed down.



To quote George Carlin, "You're sending me to my room? Great! That's where all my stuff is!"

ladyloerya


quality posts: 2 Private Messages ladyloerya

Kids are 15 (most of this doesn't apply to him anymore!) and 3. Corners for my kids for daily/small infractions. Swat on the butt and a good explanation for anything truly dangerous. My daughter is hugely dramatic though and gets stuck in kind of loops of drama...don't know how else to explain it. Nothing will break the loop except time out for what we call a "reset". Time in your room just laying down (cry all you want/need to). When you are calm and feel better, you can come out. If you are crying for my attention, the door will be closed. If you are crying because you are actually upset, the door can stay open. I will check on her periodically when I hear her calming down. Ask her if she is ready to come out. There are many times she says she is not ready yet and will choose to lay there a while longer.

kutiel


quality posts: 0 Private Messages kutiel
BlackCreekBearTRP1 wrote:Standing face first in the corner



This, with hands on their head. Why? She once picked at the wall and pulled the paint off.

:|

amandagray84


quality posts: 0 Private Messages amandagray84
amybrla wrote:What is this "time out" crap? It's called "I told you not to do that, didn't I? You did it anyway." Consequences, a few swats on the ass and then kneeling on rice in the corner for 10 minutes. My sister is the "time out" princess and her spawn are the brattiest, most disrespectful, annoying, ill-mannered little twits ever.



WOW.

ditchmonkey


quality posts: 0 Private Messages ditchmonkey

Standing nose in the corner.

dntbmbn2daretard


quality posts: 0 Private Messages dntbmbn2daretard

standing nose in a corner.

BEgraphics


quality posts: 0 Private Messages BEgraphics

Not being able to borrow the car...

theother1


quality posts: 0 Private Messages theother1

Locked in the coat closet until my Honey Boo Boo show is over, then it is time for the belt or wooden spoon.

a04971xx


quality posts: 0 Private Messages a04971xx
BlackCreekBearTRP1 wrote:Standing face first in the corner



me too

ranedae


quality posts: 0 Private Messages ranedae

Y'all are a bunch of sadists. How about thinking like a child and teaching them to think rather than punishing and causing pain? And you wonder why our world is so messed up? You. Are. The. Problem.

dimentex


quality posts: 0 Private Messages dimentex

Time Out? Is that the time they spend sniffling in their rooms after you spank their arse for disobeying?

dimentex


quality posts: 0 Private Messages dimentex
ranedae wrote:Y'all are a bunch of sadists. How about thinking like a child and teaching them to think rather than punishing and causing pain? And you wonder why our world is so messed up? You. Are. The. Problem.



No sir. Spankings were used on my generation, my father's his fathers and so on. And they were "the Greatest Generation." The problem with kids now is the "Time Out" Generation. YOU. ARE. THE. PROBLEM.

nellb123


quality posts: 0 Private Messages nellb123
dimentex wrote:No sir. Spankings were used on my generation, my father's his fathers and so on. And they were "the Greatest Generation." The problem with kids now is the "Time Out" Generation. YOU. ARE. THE. PROBLEM.



Here ! Here ! I agree.

nell-on-wheels

kjsmason2010


quality posts: 10 Private Messages kjsmason2010

My children take time outs in the corner, which isn't very often. I started making them buy someone else a gift with their allowance when they would misbehave. They had to go to the store, pick it out, and give it to the random child. They learned really quickly.

flynn78


quality posts: 0 Private Messages flynn78

Non-existant. Quick spanking and leave the issue in the past. We don't need to think about it and stew on it in the corner, that will only bring resentment. Spankings worked for me.

daylaj


quality posts: 0 Private Messages daylaj
dimentex wrote:No sir. Spankings were used on my generation, my father's his fathers and so on. And they were "the Greatest Generation." The problem with kids now is the "Time Out" Generation. YOU. ARE. THE. PROBLEM.




My kids receive time outs. And I get compliments on them from everyone I meet. I believe that it's not the Time Out Gen that is the root of the bratty entitlement movement, but more that people just need to do a time out properly. You don't simply stick them in a corner and let them out two minutes later. A proper time out involves discussion, time out, child repeat of discussion and an apology. I do see too many parents yell time out but not even tell the kids why they are there. But no, spankings are not always where the cure lies.

daylaj


quality posts: 0 Private Messages daylaj

corner. A specified corner, where, thanks to my oldest and our experiences with him in time out, you must put your nose on the wall, your tongue in your mouth, and two hands flat on the wall. For the first minute, you have to listen to mommy telling you repeatedly what you did wrong and why it was wrong. Then you are left there for 1 to 4 more minutes to think about it (depending on which kid it is). When you are finished, you have to tell mommy why you were in the corner, and you have to apologize properly to whomever is deserving of an apology. Properly means not a mumbled "sorry...." and walking away, but a clear, understandable, "I'm sorry that I _______. I know it hurt you and I did not mean to hurt you." Or something along that line.

patlb


quality posts: 0 Private Messages patlb

No time out. Never needed to. If the parent stays calm & exercises patience (after all parent is the adult-right?) Child will eventually calm down -then you can reason with them and love them with no resentment or hurt feelings on their part. Watch them grow up into responsible caring people who also do not resort to time outs, silly crap rules or other childish behavior with their children. This trendy school of thought will fall by the wayside just like Dr. Spocks's methods did. Best advice is about how to handle your children is - just love them, act like an adult and let them be children. Years of history prove it - look around you.

patlb


quality posts: 0 Private Messages patlb
daylaj wrote:corner. A specified corner, where, thanks to my oldest and our experiences with him in time out, you must put your nose on the wall, your tongue in your mouth, and two hands flat on the wall. For the first minute, you have to listen to mommy telling you repeatedly what you did wrong and why it was wrong. Then you are left there for 1 to 4 more minutes to think about it (depending on which kid it is). When you are finished, you have to tell mommy why you were in the corner, and you have to apologize properly to whomever is deserving of an apology. Properly means not a mumbled "sorry...." and walking away, but a clear, understandable, "I'm sorry that I _______. I know it hurt you and I did not mean to hurt you." Or something along that line.



OK - I'm not sure if this post is a joke or serious. If this is for real then - it sounds like the overall result is the child has learned how to memorize lines and a ritual to be performed while he/she is being degraded by being forced to maintain a ridiculous (and meaningless) physical position.
Oh and the bonus is.......another childhood memory to look back on forever (because it will NEVER be forgotten) Also you sound so proud that you perfected your procedure on your older child - Yes this is how family traditions are made and repeated.

Spiky


quality posts: 16 Private Messages Spiky
note2001 wrote:The car (with adult supervision). Time outs always worked very well when shopping and the little one tossed a tantrum in the store. Quickly leave the cart, nicely ask an employee to store in it the fridge if need be, and head to the car while letting the child know their behavior is unacceptable. When ready and they promise to be good, go back in. This is a one time only deal. After this experience none of my kids ever dared to toss another tantrum in public again.


Wow, that's a lot of work. One of my children threw a tantrum in Target once. I walked away.

None of the three ever tried it again.

Eventually the kid caught up with me after realizing no attention was given.

kschouten


quality posts: 14 Private Messages kschouten

Reading these makes me so sad.

I'm a parenting coach for parents who want to learn effective, positive discipline, and learn to help their children be productive, resilient, self contained, polite, caring, and cooperative.

I've never used a time out or any other kind of punishment. I'm not permissive or my kids' buddy, either. When they make a mistake, we work on recognizing the problem, fixing it if possible, making amends if necessary, and finding ways to cope with emotions (teaching them methods to calm down when they're angry, recognize their own triggers, etc.). It is not 1-2-3 straightforward like a timeout, but these are human beings, not little programmable robots.

I hated the way I was raised, so I decided I could do a lot better and make a difference for other parents, and demonstrate that it is more than possible to raise awesome kids that are enjoyable to be around without any punishment at all. I went back to school after I got my MA in an unrelated field and got a degree in Early Childhood Education. I didn't learn much about effective discipline there, though, or my five years working with young children professionally--it was in reading positive discipline books and raising my own kids while talking to and coaching other parents that I learned the most. Anyone can do this! Join a positive discipline group to get some support and start reading. It can make such a wonderful difference for your kids, and for you, too.

Some books I like: Kids Are Worth It! : Giving Your Child The Gift Of Inner Discipline by Barbara Coloroso

Raising our children, Raising Ourselves, by Naomi Aldort

How to Talk so Kids Will Listen and Listen so Kids Will Talk

If "time out" really appeals, try reading:
Positive Time-Out: And Over 50 Ways to Avoid Power Struggles in the Home and the Classroom, by Jane Nelsen

We expect punishment to be effective with kids when it isn't with adults. We expect kids to learn by standing in a corner when we aren't relly teaching them anything except "don't get caught" and "parents are the enemy." If we teach our children to obey simply because we say to, then they will take those lessons into their teen years and adulthood, and obey the strongest influence--and it certainly will no longer be their parents.

Teaching them to develop a strong and healthy inner moral compass that is dependent on no outside source CAN be done.

PM me... I'm happy to help or suggest more resources.