garrettwheat


quality posts: 3 Private Messages garrettwheat

Ok, so yes, I am a computer nerd, geek, etc... and I know I'm already suppose to have a cat, but I grew up with dogs. All kinds...muts, schnauzers, rottweilers, dobsons...

My wife and I would love to have a dog, but we're never home, or should I say gone for long hours at a time and take trips pretty often and I would feel like we would be neglecting it. We are home a lot, just gone a lot too.

I'm under the impression some cats are fine if left for a day or two. However, I have never really liked cats because they're so skiddish. I was told some cats can be very playful, loveable, and doggish... If that makes sense. My dogs have slept in my bed, get thrown around in a playful manner, aren't scared of random loud noises, etc, etc, etc.

Just seeing if I could get some input on a type of cat that would fit the bill from nerdy experts. Thanks



*Update*
Got Him! Here's Izzy! Our neighbor's cat was pregnant as we were looking, and I haven't been on Woot! in a while because of a new job. We just got him last night and he's only about 5 weeks old.


GodfatherND


quality posts: 0 Private Messages GodfatherND
garrettwheat wrote:Just seeing if I could get some input on a type of cat that would fit the bill from nerdy experts. Thanks



I'm familiar with generic cats (American short hair). Before selecting a kitten or cat, you should observe it first. See how it acts with its litter mates. See how it reacts to being held. Some kittens just don't want to be bothered, and they may not be the type of pet you're looking for.

A lot of the socialization will depend on you. Let's say you're taking your cat to the vet. You put her in the pet carrier and place it on the front seat. As you drive, she might complain a little. If you react by saying, "oohhh, poor kitty..." (or whatever) in a soft voice, you'll just reinforce the anxiety. You should be upbeat, and the cat will like car rides.

Cats require more attention when they're young than a dog does. If you're petting or scratching the cat and she starts closing her eyes, you're doing it right. Close your eyes (make it look like you're sleepy), and the cat will be more at ease. Heck, they sleep about 20 hours a day anyway!

sassymango


quality posts: 2 Private Messages sassymango


Just seeing if I could get some input on a type of cat that would fit the bill from nerdy experts. Thanks[/quote]

One thing to consider is to go to a reputable pet adoption group. Lots of adult cats are looking for homes & you will know their personality and can judge if it will fit in with yours. If you are going to be gone for long periods of time, you might want to give consideration to adopting 2 cats so they can keep each other company. There are many adult pairs of cats looking for good homes who grew up together. You will have an assessment of their personalities, eating habits, litter box habits, etc.



dontwantaname


quality posts: 13 Private Messages dontwantaname

Volunteer Moderator



I am thinking sassymango is correct.
I'm not a cat person, but I'm thinking 2 cats.
If I was getting my own cat, I would be looking for a "dog" cat too. I've met them. I know they exist.
My son's cat seems to have become my responsibility. He is an aloof cat.

Daughter got a kitten last year. She now says she would get an adult if she had it to do again.
Her cat is not that affectionate to her. Which is not abnormal for a cat. Hard to tell with a kitten.

The vet said you should get 10 years of health before the cats seem to start getting old. So a 1 or 2 year old cat is still young and you can see it's personality.

Right now the petco near us has a mother daughter set they are trying to adopt out together.
You should be able to get two cats that know each other.

Ask a vet if a cat needs company when alone for a weekend.

Good luck! Get some two sided tape they sell at the pet store. It works at keeping the cat from scratching stuff.



WE LURV YOU TOO! Dork!!!
No greater love is lost than that not shared.

Mavyn


quality posts: 22 Private Messages Mavyn

Cats can be more challenging to match up with, since personalities are not as breed based as dogs, unless you go for purebred.

In general, cats will be happier when you let them come to you, rather than you trying to make them do something with you. Give them a reason to choose you....petting, food, toys.

I think an adult cat would be better, as well. Get one, since two cats that are already bonded will be less likely to bond with you. If the first works out, wait 3-4 months, and then add a friend. Let the 'old' cat meet the new one a few times before adopting, to make sure they get along.

My speech is not parsing. I am speaking in ellipsis.

inkycatz


quality posts: 105 Private Messages inkycatz

A cat is a wonderful idea. (Yeah, I'm biased, I love cats.)

Here's a couple threads filled with great advice from Deals I found for you:
Cat Adoption
Cat behavior
Toys

Catster is an excellent resource, as well as they have a weekly newsletter if you adopt a kitten that tends to follow along with their first year, and after that goes into general topics (a recent one was traveling with your pet). I like it because it's not product pushing, it's 'this is where your cat is at in this stage of growth', and even as a lifelong cat owner who signed up on it for a whim, it's interesting what I didn't know. ;)

This will help you narrow down breeds to keep an eye out for. Most shelter cats are just a mix of a lot of things, and cat personalities DO vary but that will help you keep an eye out on things to keep in mind for breeds.

This book:
Starting from Scratch: How to Correct Behavior Problems in Your Adult Cat by Pam Johnson-Bennett is pretty fantastic for reference, too. If you get an adult cat there will be issues most likely (especially if they've been bounced from home to home, sadly) but all easily handled.

Regardless, I wish you luck and hope to see many happy pet pictures soon!

I'm just hanging out, really.

jwkidd80


quality posts: 1 Private Messages jwkidd80
garrettwheat wrote:Ok, so yes, I am a computer nerd, geek, etc... and I know I'm already suppose to have a cat, but I grew up with dogs. All kinds...muts, schnauzers, rottweilers, dobsons...

My wife and I would love to have a dog, but we're never home, or should I say gone for long hours at a time and take trips pretty often and I would feel like we would be neglecting it. We are home a lot, just gone a lot too.

I'm under the impression some cats are fine if left for a day or two. However, I have never really liked cats because they're so skiddish. I was told some cats can be very playful, loveable, and doggish... If that makes sense. My dogs have slept in my bed, get thrown around in a playful manner, aren't scared of random loud noises, etc, etc, etc.

Just seeing if I could get some input on a type of cat that would fit the bill from nerdy experts. Thanks



I had a persian for the longest. (Think flat face.) Other than him being so high maintenance because of his long hair he was very doggish. I always thought he was less like a cat and more like a dog.

jasneko


quality posts: 30 Private Messages jasneko

I wanted to echo/emphasis what others have said - if you're not home much, adopt 2 cats - preferably that are siblings or already get along with each other. Most definitely adopt 2 if you are gone a day or two at a time.

Two cats are surprisingly not much more work than having one. It will be better both for you and the cats - the cats will have each other for company and be less likely to take out their loneliness/boredom on your house, or by getting into mischief. Among many other reasons to get ]more than one.

Cats can be extremely loving and affectionate, but of course it also depends on the individual cat - and the way they are treated!

And like others said, getting cats, or older kittens might be better if you want to see their personalities ahead of time - and because kittens need a lot of attention (and human contact, if you want them not to be skittish).

Many adoption places can tell you cat personalities of their non-kitten tenants, or you can observe them. Also research and see if there are adoption places that have cats in foster homes - again you can hear about their personalities or sometimes even visit to observe them ahead of time.

Hope that helps! I originally wanted a dog when I was a kid but was only allowed a cat...now I adore cats

Vote!



AZGman


quality posts: 3 Private Messages AZGman
garrettwheat wrote:Ok, so yes, I am a computer nerd, geek, etc... and I know I'm already suppose to have a cat, but I grew up with dogs. All kinds...muts, schnauzers, rottweilers, dobsons...

My wife and I would love to have a dog, but we're never home, or should I say gone for long hours at a time and take trips pretty often and I would feel like we would be neglecting it. We are home a lot, just gone a lot too.

I'm under the impression some cats are fine if left for a day or two. However, I have never really liked cats because they're so skiddish. I was told some cats can be very playful, loveable, and doggish... If that makes sense. My dogs have slept in my bed, get thrown around in a playful manner, aren't scared of random loud noises, etc, etc, etc.

Just seeing if I could get some input on a type of cat that would fit the bill from nerdy experts. Thanks



You're married; wouldn't a cat be redundant?


Grumpy 'til the day I die.

garrettwheat


quality posts: 3 Private Messages garrettwheat

Wow, guess I didn't know there would be this much too it. I've been researching a bit and may have to take the two-cat road. There is a few shelters close by and one had a Mother-Daughter pair. Appreciate all the words of wisdom and links.

@Inkycats - quit researching cats so much and ship me a Barrel of Crops! Haha, I kid, I kid...

I guess another question I have for the dire cat lovers... is it wrong to de-claw them? I've heard that it hurts them pretty bad for a few weeks or so, but I have a very nice leather couch I would shoot one if they scratched it.

maggie3052


quality posts: 3 Private Messages maggie3052
garrettwheat wrote:Wow, guess I didn't know there would be this much too it. I've been researching a bit and may have to take the two-cat road. There is a few shelters close by and one had a Mother-Daughter pair. Appreciate all the words of wisdom and links.

@Inkycats - quit researching cats so much and ship me a Barrel of Crops! Haha, I kid, I kid...

I guess another question I have for the dire cat lovers... is it wrong to de-claw them? I've heard that it hurts them pretty bad for a few weeks or so, but I have a very nice leather couch I would shoot one if they scratched it.



NO! Do not de-claw. There is a bunch of things you can do to stop/deter them from the couch. Would you like your fingernails pulled from your fingers? My sister had 3 cats de-clawed. It completely changed their personalities. Not for the good. One to this day, is still in pain when he jumps around.

Sorry, please don't even consider it. I'll give a list of alternatives but that is not an option..

jasneko


quality posts: 30 Private Messages jasneko

That's great you are thinking to go with 2 cats! As long as those cats get along (hopefully the mother and daughter do?), it is most likely the much happier option for everyone.

Agreed with Maggie - a vet told me that cat claws are used in their walking/running/jumping balancing etc, and it's the equivalent of cutting off a human's toes. Bone, tendons and more are amputated. And if they ever go outside by accident, they are in trouble.

To prevent scratching -I highly recommend getting many scratching pads of various angles and shapes (works much better than the flat ones... I can make specific recommendations if you want!) and put them all around. If a cat scratches something else, make a negative sound (not too scary, but obviously negative), pick them up and put them on one of the scratching pads. If they start scratching there, praise them in a positive tone of voice

Also start early in trimming their nails so they don't get super long and sharp and the cats gets used to having them clipped.

If there is any area they still try to scratch, in the beginning, cover it with plastic or aluminum foil to deter them until they learn they are only to scratch the scratching pads.

Then there are other methods to stop scratching too (like claw caps), but I haven't tried them as the methods I listed worked for me.

Vote!



dontwantaname


quality posts: 13 Private Messages dontwantaname

Volunteer Moderator

My son's cat hasn't bothered the leather furniture. He likes loose weave cloth. We have a couch and a chair that the material is sort of a loose weave and he went for both of them.

I did buy the two sided tape at the pet store, that works.

He has also randomly scratched wood furniture, but all of mine is slightly distressed , so I use the colored polish and it takes care of it.

Declawing....my vet will do it, I'm surprised at that. It is taking off the end of their fingers and it can change their temperament if they then feel defenseless.

If you feel that strongly about not ruining any stuff, maybe get a cat that is already declawed. Once again, you would know the personality. Also, I've read, even places that are ok with it, only do the front. The cat might be able to climb with the back if it gets out.


Ask at the vet offices. Most of them know of cats up for adoption. That can be another place to look.


My experience is just with one cat, listen to the people who have had time longer....although I know dog owners who have always had dogs and know nothing about them!


Also.....you are now required to post pictures of the one or two perfect cats when you get them!!!!



WE LURV YOU TOO! Dork!!!
No greater love is lost than that not shared.

garrettwheat


quality posts: 3 Private Messages garrettwheat
dontwantaname wrote:
My experience is just with one cat, listen to the people who have had time longer....although I know dog owners who have always had dogs and know nothing about them!

Also.....you are now required to post pictures of the one or two perfect cats when you get them!!!!




Yeah, thanks. Actually, after I posted that last night my wife informed me we would NOT declaw them because then we couldn't let them out and they couldn't defend their selves from our parents dogs when we sit or the neighbors dogs. I have a good friend at a local vet I haven't had time to call just yet. Always good to have multiple views on something and I appreciate the responses.

Will post pics if and when we decide to adopt.

Mavyn


quality posts: 22 Private Messages Mavyn

I've gone both routes, and won't declaw again. Yes, declawed cats can still fight and climb and hunt, but it hurts them and depending on how it's done, it can result in deformed feet that are increasingly painful as they age. My current cats both have their claws. Both love the cardboard scratching loungers (this is their favorite style). The eldest uses them and concrete when he's outside (supervised visitation only, I don't recommend letting cats free roam outside). The youngest is a brat and will use other things, but since I've given her a chair of her own, she's better and leaves most other things alone--when she sharpens elsewhere now, it's because she wants attention.

My cats have never liked the sisal sharpeners, and have never used any of the cat furniture to sharpen. The youngest loves the tower (it's over 6ft tall) but the oldest lives by 'look before you leap' so never uses it.

My speech is not parsing. I am speaking in ellipsis.

inkycatz


quality posts: 105 Private Messages inkycatz
Mavyn wrote:I've gone both routes, and won't declaw again. Yes, declawed cats can still fight and climb and hunt, but it hurts them and depending on how it's done, it can result in deformed feet that are increasingly painful as they age.



My mom used to declaw, but once I was old enough to move out and realize what it was about my cats since then have always had claws.

Love the loungers!

I'm just hanging out, really.

Mavyn


quality posts: 22 Private Messages Mavyn
inkycatz wrote:My mom used to declaw, but once I was old enough to move out and realize what it was about my cats since then have always had claws.

Love the loungers!



We only had 4 cats declawed, all when we moved into a rental unit.

Growing up, my cats were indoor/outdoor cats. We lost several to coyotes/dogs/unknown accidents, so now, my cats only go outside in the backyard under supervision. They don't mind, and are always happy to come back inside.

My speech is not parsing. I am speaking in ellipsis.

PemberDucky


quality posts: 41 Private Messages PemberDucky

Staff

Mavyn wrote:We only had 4 cats declawed, all when we moved into a rental unit.

Growing up, my cats were indoor/outdoor cats. We lost several to coyotes/dogs/unknown accidents, so now, my cats only go outside in the backyard under supervision. They don't mind, and are always happy to come back inside.



We declawed.
I know, I'm going to get the glares, but. In my defense, he's a polydactyl cat and the little moron was getting stuck to EVERYTHING (including himself one night). We became worried for his safety.


garrettwheat wrote:Will post pics if and when we decide to adopt.



DID YOU DO IT YET? WHERE ARE THEM PICS?


-----------------------------------------------
Not sure if you should post that? This slightly-nsfw-flowchart will help.

Mavyn


quality posts: 22 Private Messages Mavyn
PemberDucky wrote:We declawed.
I know, I'm going to get the glares, but. In my defense, he's a polydactyl cat and the little daffodil was getting stuck to EVERYTHING (including himself one night). We became worried for his safety.



I had a pair of polydactyls, and three kittens from different litters they had. I worried more about declawing them because there was so much more involved. The first ones had 'mittens', they had so many extra toes. I trimmed nails twice a week. It was a pita.

My speech is not parsing. I am speaking in ellipsis.

Josephus


quality posts: 25 Private Messages Josephus
PemberDucky wrote:DID YOU DO IT YET? WHERE ARE THEM PICS?



you...DECLAWER!

PemberDucky


quality posts: 41 Private Messages PemberDucky

Staff

Josephus wrote:you...DECLAWER!



Ralphie wrath is the cutest wrath.

Mavyn wrote:I had a pair of polydactyls, and three kittens from different litters they had. I worried more about declawing them because there was so much more involved. The first ones had 'mittens', they had so many extra toes. I trimmed nails twice a week. It was a pita.



YES! Same deal here. Freakish little hands. (WHICH HE HAS FIGURED OUT HOW TO LEVERAGE, BTW.) He throws his toys to himself sometimes.


-----------------------------------------------
Not sure if you should post that? This slightly-nsfw-flowchart will help.

Mavyn


quality posts: 22 Private Messages Mavyn
PemberDucky wrote:YES! Same deal here. Freakish little hands. (WHICH HE HAS FIGURED OUT HOW TO LEVERAGE, BTW.) He throws his toys to himself sometimes.



Both girls could use theirs as well. None of the kittens had as many extra, though, only one or two. I think that one of the children is still alive (and living in Seattle, ha!). Rowena had 4 litters, Rebecca had one and most of them were disfigured beyond survival (kink in the spinal column). The girls didn't go into heat until they were 2 years old, didn't expect them to be fertile.

Edit to add: Get some towels, too. Happy cats drool.

My speech is not parsing. I am speaking in ellipsis.

cptgone


quality posts: 4 Private Messages cptgone

i got 2 kittens 2 years ago. i'm very glad i got 2, and from the same nest! they get along wonderfully, and keep each other company while i'm away. needless to say, i didn't have 'em declawed, it's easy to train 'em not to scratch couches etc. (i recommend this book: "Think Like a Cat: How to Raise a Well-Adjusted Cat--Not a Sour Puss")

dontwantaname


quality posts: 13 Private Messages dontwantaname

Volunteer Moderator

I didn't pick him.
Son and friends rented a house for senior year of college.
Cat must have lived there and was left behind by the kids the year before.
Son took him in. Got him fixed and shots .

Somehow, now he is mine.
Refuses to sit in my lap and purr.
But not that destructive either.

Scratchy


WE LURV YOU TOO! Dork!!!
No greater love is lost than that not shared.

Mavyn


quality posts: 22 Private Messages Mavyn

Aww! He's a pretty boy.

Neither of mine are sink cats. Maggie will wander around the shower, and both like playing in the big bathtub, but have no interest in sinks.

My speech is not parsing. I am speaking in ellipsis.

RWoodward


quality posts: 58 Private Messages RWoodward

I've been around cats my whole life. This is just an observation, but to me it seemed that the more vocal the kitten, the more people-oriented the cat will be. I hypothesize that when a kitten vocalizes to people, they are looking for a parental figure. Kittens who do not try to "communicate" tend to gro up to be cats that ignore you.

Also, many cats tend to bond with one family member more than the other(s). It's not unusual for a cat to be extremely affectionate to one spouse and ignore the other, even if both are cat lovers. We have one that follows my wife pretty much everywhere, and waits in the window when it's time for her to come home. Another has to sit in my lap whenever I watch TV or read. She's friendly enough with my wife, but she wants to sit with daddy, especially if I'm in the recliner.

zhaoqian


quality posts: 0 Private Messages zhaoqian

for the people who always alone, the cat may keep them from lonely

no1


quality posts: 7 Private Messages no1
zhaoqian wrote:for the people who always alone, the cat may keep them from lonely



for seniors living alone, 300 cats must work even better.

fes


quality posts: 7 Private Messages fes

The giant cardboard cat scratching thingies work great. My cat hasn't picked the carpet since I bought one.

dontwantaname


quality posts: 13 Private Messages dontwantaname

Volunteer Moderator

Mavyn wrote:Aww! He's a pretty boy.

Neither of mine are sink cats. Maggie will wander around the shower, and both like playing in the big bathtub, but have no interest in sinks.



He hasn't been in the sink in a long time. Now he likes the throw rug in front of the toilet, if he is in that room. Then gets upset if you need that spae for your feet.
Somehow he has found 2 or 3 cozy spots in every room in the house, including the closets.

WE LURV YOU TOO! Dork!!!
No greater love is lost than that not shared.

dontwantaname


quality posts: 13 Private Messages dontwantaname

Volunteer Moderator

Garrettwheat, did you ever get the cat?

WE LURV YOU TOO! Dork!!!
No greater love is lost than that not shared.

klozitshoper


quality posts: 2 Private Messages klozitshoper

I have found that single cats get along very well (but then again I have always had a dog) if they are very young and you get one from a shelter or a breeder. There are shelters that mention when they have a bonded pair that they do not wish to separate, and that is how I ended up with 2 for eight years. The older one has recently passed on, and it took the younger one (8 years old!) a few weeks to start being friendly on his own and doing things he had never done before. I am content with just one cat, although I miss the one that died this year with all of my heart. It is considerably less work with only 1, it really is, especially when they are indoor cats.

no1


quality posts: 7 Private Messages no1
klozitshoper wrote:It is considerably less work with only 1, it really is, especially when they are indoor cats.



we found almost the opposite, there was some extra care for two cats in some areas but that was offset by a decrease in the amount of individual attention they demanded from their people. our 2 cats occupy each other whereas before the 1 cat kept nipping at my toes when he wanted to play (which was often). it prolly makes a difference if the cats were senior cats to begin with, they're usually not as active so mabe requiring less active playtime.

Mavyn


quality posts: 22 Private Messages Mavyn

My cats are not friends. They can barely tolerate each other enough to sit on/near me at the same time. They have very different maintenance issues. Puck is VERY demanding when it comes to the food/water bowls, and will wake me up to remedy low levels. He wants some attention every day, but is ok waiting until I've sat down. Maggie doesn't worry much about food, but needs way more petting and play time. She will follow me around crying until she gets attention. She will also play fetch until I'm sick of it--although not as much, now that we have hard wood floors so toys 'play' better.

My speech is not parsing. I am speaking in ellipsis.

mvsopen


quality posts: 44 Private Messages mvsopen

Look at a pair (Brother/sister) of Siamese. I was an avid anti-cat person until I was "adopted" by an aging Siamese. The day she moved away, we went out and bought the two of them. A Siamese isn't really a cat as much as a 5 year old wearing a fur suit! They will tear up your stuff (They excel in that sir!), they will jump into any open bag or box (Take that, Maru!) and, unconditionally, they will win your heart over.

radi0j0hn


quality posts: 93 Private Messages radi0j0hn
garrettwheat wrote:Ok, so yes, I am a computer nerd, geek, etc... and I know I'm already suppose to have a cat, but I grew up with dogs. All kinds...muts, schnauzers, rottweilers, dobsons...

My wife and I would love to have a dog, but we're never home, or should I say gone for long hours at a time and take trips pretty often and I would feel like we would be neglecting it. We are home a lot, just gone a lot too.

I'm under the impression some cats are fine if left for a day or two. However, I have never really liked cats because they're so skiddish. I was told some cats can be very playful, loveable, and doggish... If that makes sense. My dogs have slept in my bed, get thrown around in a playful manner, aren't scared of random loud noises, etc, etc, etc.

Just seeing if I could get some input on a type of cat that would fit the bill from nerdy experts. Thanks



Get two. Go to a shelter and see if there are two that are siblings or seem to be either huddling together or -better yet- playing together. They'll be companions for life and keep each other amused. ALSO, keep in mind you seldom ever get a true idea of the behavior of a cats when you are visiting a friend's house. You're a stranger. I have eight (!) strays that made it to my farmhouse and they are all loving, happy and very involved in my daily activities.

acpress.com Not cute, but useful.

atravis6


quality posts: 0 Private Messages atravis6
garrettwheat wrote:Ok, so yes, I am a computer nerd, geek, etc... and I know I'm already suppose to have a cat, but I grew up with dogs. All kinds...muts, schnauzers, rottweilers, dobsons...

My wife and I would love to have a dog, but we're never home, or should I say gone for long hours at a time and take trips pretty often and I would feel like we would be neglecting it. We are home a lot, just gone a lot too.

I'm under the impression some cats are fine if left for a day or two. However, I have never really liked cats because they're so skiddish. I was told some cats can be very playful, loveable, and doggish... If that makes sense. My dogs have slept in my bed, get thrown around in a playful manner, aren't scared of random loud noises, etc, etc, etc.

Just seeing if I could get some input on a type of cat that would fit the bill from nerdy experts. Thanks



Hi there! I'm a little late joining the conversation, but FYI I'm a Registered Vet Tech of many years experience, have several cats of my own (two are cat dogs, one is more aloof but still friendly) and would be happy to give any advice you desire, either pre or post adoption. Just give me a shout (:

goneferal


quality posts: 18 Private Messages goneferal
dontwantaname wrote:I didn't pick him.
Son and friends rented a house for senior year of college.
Cat must have lived there and was left behind by the kids the year before.
Son took him in. Got him fixed and shots.



Your son is a good man.

margiecakes


quality posts: 2 Private Messages margiecakes
jasneko wrote:
Agreed with Maggie - a vet told me that cat claws are used in their walking/running/jumping balancing etc, and it's the equivalent of cutting off a human's toes. Bone, tendons and more are amputated. And if they ever go outside by accident, they are in trouble.



This, this, thisity, thisthis!

Last year, my colleague decided to get rid of her 9 year old de-clawed cat and rather than let her take the cat to the pound (where she surely would have been euthanized), I took her in.

She is majorly clumsy and is limited in where she can go and what she can do. She hates having her paws touched, and will gently snap at you if you rub them. Worst of all, she has problems with the litter box, presumably because her paws are tender, or she developed incorrectly due to the lack of claws during the time she was learning how to potty. She doesn't bury her leavings, is very timid about going in the box, and often just pees on anything soft that is on the floor (clothes, bathmat, towels, etc). Also, she constantly puts her paws in her water-dish, which I think is her attempt to 'clean' her paws, but could just be her being neurotic.

It is a really painful procedure for cats, and not at all like clipping nails -- despite what some people claim.

I know other people suggested ways to deter scratching, but one I can add is getting 'Feliway' (I think that is the name?) spray or diffusers. It releases a smell imperceptible to humans, but simulates the pheromones that calm cats down. Plug a diffuser in near the couch, and perhaps -- in combination with making sure he/she has lots of things that he/she can claw safely -- it will deter the cat from becoming claw-y while near the couch.

That being said, I've had two cats that were totally 'dog' cats. Loved to be held, constantly wanted to lay on me and be petted, followed me around, enjoyed playing and chasing balls -- one cat even would fetch the ball and bring it back to me to throw again and again.

Try looking into rescues, as they usually have cats in foster situations. You e-mail the rescuer place and explain your living situation (for example, how much time you are away from the house) along with the fact that you want an affectionate/dog-like cat, and they will usually try and find one that meets your needs.

Best of luck, mate!



garrettwheat


quality posts: 3 Private Messages garrettwheat

Got Him! Here's Izzy! Our neighbor's cat was pregnant as we were looking, and I haven't been on Woot! in a while because of a new job. We just got him last night and he's only about 5 weeks old.